layout: post
title: Some Initial Api In Numpy
date: 2017-06-10 12:00:00 +08:00

tags: [Python]

Writing At First

This note I will say something about numpy. And what I will say is most about initial function like some functions that create some objects.


Then I will say what I think

numpy.array

array(object, dtype=None, copy=True, order=None, subok=False, ndmin=0)

Object is a list or turple which likes [1,2] or (1,2) or [[1,2],[1,2]] or etc.

dtype is to input a type object that is from numpy package.

copy I don't know. I never use this parameter in this function. Also others parameters I never use it. Many times I just want to create a new array object. So I just use the first and the second parameters.

And It's output is a numpy.ndarray object. And it saves the array we uesd.

Example :

In [6]: numpy.array([1,2,3])
Out[6]: array([1, 2, 3])

And its type is int32.

numpy.arange

arange([start,] stop[, step,], dtype=None)

And it's function defined like this:

arange(start=None, stop=None, step=None, dtype=None)

This function likes range or xrange. In order to create a new array likes [1,2,3,4,5].

start is the array's first number.
stop is the array's length.
step is how long will the nearly number be.
dtype is its type.

Example :

In [8]: numpy.arange(5)
Out[8]: array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4])

In [9]: numpy.arange(1,5)
Out[9]: array([1, 2, 3, 4])

In [10]: numpy.arange(1,10,2)
Out[10]: array([1, 3, 5, 7, 9])

numpy.zeros

zeros(shape, dtype=None, order='C')

Shape is the shape , likes (1,2) and it will create a matrix of one line two column. Also you can create a three dimensions tensor or others.

dtype is its type.

order is how to save in the memory. We don't need to care.

Example :

In [12]: numpy.zeros((2,2,2))
Out[12]:
array([[[ 0.,  0.],
        [ 0.,  0.]],

       [[ 0.,  0.],
        [ 0.,  0.]]])

In [13]: numpy.zeros((2,2))
Out[13]:
array([[ 0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.]])


In [14]: numpy.zeros((2,2,2,2))
Out[14]:
array([[[[ 0.,  0.],
         [ 0.,  0.]],

        [[ 0.,  0.],
         [ 0.,  0.]]],


       [[[ 0.,  0.],
         [ 0.,  0.]],

        [[ 0.,  0.],
         [ 0.,  0.]]]])

numpy.ones

ones(shape, dtype=None, order='C')

The same as numpy.zeros. But the output is some one rather than zero.

Example :

In [2]: numpy.ones(5)
Out[2]: array([ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.])

In [3]: numpy.ones((2,2))
Out[3]:
array([[ 1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.]])


In [4]: np.ones((2,2,2))
Out[4]:
array([[[ 1.,  1.],
        [ 1.,  1.]],

       [[ 1.,  1.],
        [ 1.,  1.]]])

numpy.zeros_like

zeros_like(a, dtype=None, order='K', subok=True)

I think what its doc said is very good .It's :

Return an array of zeros with the same shape and type as a given array.

a is a numpy.ndarray object

dtype is its type.

order is the same as that in the functions before. Something about the C or Fortran.

subok I don't know what it is. I try both True and False. But I didn't find the difference.

Example :

In [2]: a = numpy.array([[1,2,3,4,5],[2,3,4,5,6],[3,4,5,6,7]])

In [3]: numpy.zeros_like(a)
Out[3]:
array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

numpy.ones_like

ones_like(a, dtype=None, order='K', subok=True)

The same as zeros_like, but its output is one.

Examples :

In [2]: a = numpy.array([[1,2,3,4,5],[2,3,4,5,6],[3,4,5,6,7]])

In [3]: numpy.ones_like(a)
Out[3]:
array([[1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1]])

numpy.eye

eye(N, M=None, k=0, dtype=float)

This function can create likes Unit matrix.

Example :

In [5]: numpy.eye(5)
Out[5]:
array([[ 1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.]])

In [6]: numpy.eye(5,M=3)
Out[6]:
array([[ 1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.]])

In [7]: numpy.eye(5,M=3,k=1)
Out[7]:
array([[ 0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.]])

Some others

There also have functions likes numpy.empty and numpy.empty_like. They likes numpy.ones and ones_like or others. But they return an uninitialized (arbitrary) data

In [8]: numpy.empty(5)
Out[8]: array([ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.])

In [9]: numpy.empty_like(a)
Out[9]:
array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

This is numpy's Python doc

numpy.array

array(object, dtype=None, copy=True, order=None, subok=False, ndmin=0)

Create an array.

Parameters

object : array_like

An array, any object exposing the array interface, an
object whose array method returns an array, or any
(nested) sequence.

dtype : data-type, optional

The desired data-type for the array. If not given, then
the type will be determined as the minimum type required
to hold the objects in the sequence. This argument can only
be used to 'upcast' the array. For downcasting, use the
.astype(t) method.

copy : bool, optional

If true (default), then the object is copied. Otherwise, a copy
will only be made if array returns a copy, if obj is a
nested sequence, or if a copy is needed to satisfy any of the other
requirements (dtype, order, etc.).

order : {'C', 'F', 'A'}, optional

Specify the order of the array. If order is 'C', then the array
will be in C-contiguous order (last-index varies the fastest).
If order is 'F', then the returned array will be in
Fortran-contiguous order (first-index varies the fastest).
If order is 'A' (default), then the returned array may be
in any order (either C-, Fortran-contiguous, or even discontiguous),
unless a copy is required, in which case it will be C-contiguous.

subok : bool, optional

If True, then sub-classes will be passed-through, otherwise
the returned array will be forced to be a base-class array (default).

ndmin : int, optional

Specifies the minimum number of dimensions that the resulting
array should have. Ones will be pre-pended to the shape as
needed to meet this requirement.

Returns

out : ndarray

An array object satisfying the specified requirements.

See Also

empty, empty_like, zeros, zeros_like, ones, ones_like, fill

Examples

np.array([1, 2, 3])
array([1, 2, 3])

Upcasting:

np.array([1, 2, 3.0])
array([ 1.,  2.,  3.])

More than one dimension:

np.array([[1, 2], [3, 4]])
array([[1, 2],
       [3, 4]])

Minimum dimensions 2:

np.array([1, 2, 3], ndmin=2)
array([[1, 2, 3]])

Type provided:

np.array([1, 2, 3], dtype=complex)
array([ 1.+0.j,  2.+0.j,  3.+0.j])

Data-type consisting of more than one element:

x = np.array([(1,2),(3,4)],dtype=[('a','<i4'),('b','<i4')])
x['a']
array([1, 3])

Creating an array from sub-classes:

np.array(np.mat('1 2; 3 4'))
array([[1, 2],
       [3, 4]])

np.array(np.mat('1 2; 3 4'), subok=True)
matrix([[1, 2],
        [3, 4]])

numpy.arange

arange([start,] stop[, step,], dtype=None)

Return evenly spaced values within a given interval.

Values are generated within the half-open interval [start, stop)
(in other words, the interval including start but excluding stop).
For integer arguments the function is equivalent to the Python built-in
range <http://docs.python.org/lib/built-in-funcs.html>_ function,
but returns an ndarray rather than a list.

When using a non-integer step, such as 0.1, the results will often not
be consistent. It is better to use linspace for these cases.

Parameters

start : number, optional

Start of interval. The interval includes this value. The default
start value is 0.

stop : number

End of interval. The interval does not include this value, except
in some cases where step is not an integer and floating point
round-off affects the length of out.

step : number, optional

Spacing between values. For any output out, this is the distance
between two adjacent values, out[i+1] - out[i]. The default
step size is 1. If step is specified, start must also be given.

dtype : dtype

The type of the output array. If dtype is not given, infer the data
type from the other input arguments.

Returns

arange : ndarray

Array of evenly spaced values.
For floating point arguments, the length of the result is
ceil((stop - start)/step). Because of floating point overflow,
this rule may result in the last element of out being greater
than stop.

See Also

linspace : Evenly spaced numbers with careful handling of endpoints.

ogrid: Arrays of evenly spaced numbers in N-dimensions.

mgrid: Grid-shaped arrays of evenly spaced numbers in N-dimensions.

Examples

np.arange(3)
array([0, 1, 2])
np.arange(3.0)
array([ 0.,  1.,  2.])
np.arange(3,7)
array([3, 4, 5, 6])
np.arange(3,7,2)
array([3, 5])

numpy.zeros

zeros(shape, dtype=float, order='C')

Return a new array of given shape and type, filled with zeros.

Parameters

shape : int or sequence of ints

Shape of the new array, e.g., (2, 3) or 2.

dtype : data-type, optional

The desired data-type for the array, e.g., numpy.int8. Default is
numpy.float64.

order : {'C', 'F'}, optional

Whether to store multidimensional data in C- or Fortran-contiguous
(row- or column-wise) order in memory.

Returns

out : ndarray

Array of zeros with the given shape, dtype, and order.

See Also

zeros_like : Return an array of zeros with shape and type of input.

ones_like : Return an array of ones with shape and type of input.

empty_like : Return an empty array with shape and type of input.

ones : Return a new array setting values to one.

empty : Return a new uninitialized array.

Examples

np.zeros(5)
array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])

np.zeros((5,), dtype=np.int)
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0])

np.zeros((2, 1))
array([[ 0.],
             [ 0.]])

s = (2,2)
np.zeros(s)
array([[ 0.,  0.],
             [ 0.,  0.]])

np.zeros((2,), dtype=[('x', 'i4'), ('y', 'i4')]) # custom dtype
array([(0, 0), (0, 0)],
            dtype=[('x', '<i4'), ('y', '<i4')])

numpy.ones

Return a new array of given shape and type, filled with ones.

Parameters

shape : int or sequence of ints

Shape of the new array, e.g., (2, 3) or 2.

dtype : data-type, optional

The desired data-type for the array, e.g., numpy.int8. Default is
numpy.float64.

order : {'C', 'F'}, optional

Whether to store multidimensional data in C- or Fortran-contiguous
(row- or column-wise) order in memory.

Returns

out : ndarray

Array of ones with the given shape, dtype, and order.

See Also

zeros, ones_like

Examples

np.ones(5)
array([ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.])
np.ones((5,), dtype=np.int)
array([1, 1, 1, 1, 1])
np.ones((2, 1))
array([[ 1.],
       [ 1.]])
s = (2,2)
np.ones(s)
array([[ 1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.]])

numpy.zeros_like

Return an array of zeros with the same shape and type as a given array.

Parameters

a : array_like

The shape and data-type of a define these same attributes of
the returned array.

dtype : data-type, optional

Overrides the data type of the result.
.. versionadded:: 1.6.0

order : {'C', 'F', 'A', or 'K'}, optional

Overrides the memory layout of the result. 'C' means C-order,
'F' means F-order, 'A' means 'F' if a is Fortran contiguous,
'C' otherwise. 'K' means match the layout of a as closely
as possible.
.. versionadded:: 1.6.0

subok : bool, optional.

If True, then the newly created array will use the sub-class
type of 'a', otherwise it will be a base-class array. Defaults
to True.

Returns

out : ndarray

Array of zeros with the same shape and type as a.

See Also

ones_like : Return an array of ones with shape and type of input.

empty_like : Return an empty array with shape and type of input.

zeros : Return a new array setting values to zero.

ones : Return a new array setting values to one.

empty : Return a new uninitialized array.

Examples

x = np.arange(6)
x = x.reshape((2, 3))
x
array([[0, 1, 2],
       [3, 4, 5]])
np.zeros_like(x)
array([[0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0]])
y = np.arange(3, dtype=np.float)
y
array([ 0.,  1.,  2.])
np.zeros_like(y)
array([ 0.,  0.,  0.])

numpy.ones_like

Return an array of ones with the same shape and type as a given array.

Parameters

a : array_like

The shape and data-type of a define these same attributes of
the returned array.

dtype : data-type, optional

Overrides the data type of the result.
.. versionadded:: 1.6.0

order : {'C', 'F', 'A', or 'K'}, optional

Overrides the memory layout of the result. 'C' means C-order,
'F' means F-order, 'A' means 'F' if a is Fortran contiguous,
'C' otherwise. 'K' means match the layout of a as closely
as possible.
.. versionadded:: 1.6.0

subok : bool, optional.

If True, then the newly created array will use the sub-class
type of 'a', otherwise it will be a base-class array. Defaults
to True.

Returns

out : ndarray

Array of ones with the same shape and type as a.

See Also

zeros_like : Return an array of zeros with shape and type of input.

empty_like : Return an empty array with shape and type of input.

zeros : Return a new array setting values to zero.

ones : Return a new array setting values to one.

empty : Return a new uninitialized array.

Examples

x = np.arange(6)
x = x.reshape((2, 3))
x
array([[0, 1, 2],
       [3, 4, 5]])
np.ones_like(x)
array([[1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 1]])
y = np.arange(3, dtype=np.float)
y
array([ 0.,  1.,  2.])
np.ones_like(y)
array([ 1.,  1.,  1.])

numpy.eye

Return a 2-D array with ones on the diagonal and zeros elsewhere.

Parameters

N : int

Number of rows in the output.

M : int, optional

Number of columns in the output. If None, defaults to N.

k : int, optional

Index of the diagonal: 0 (the default) refers to the main diagonal,
a positive value refers to an upper diagonal, and a negative value
to a lower diagonal.

dtype : data-type, optional

Data-type of the returned array.

Returns

I : ndarray of shape (N,M)

An array where all elements are equal to zero, except for the k-th
diagonal, whose values are equal to one.

See Also

identity : (almost) equivalent function

diag : diagonal 2-D array from a 1-D array specified by the user.

Examples

np.eye(2, dtype=int)
array([[1, 0],
       [0, 1]])
np.eye(3, k=1)
array([[ 0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.]])

numpy.empty

empty(shape, dtype=float, order='C')

Return a new array of given shape and type, without initializingentries.

Parameters

shape : int or tuple of int

Shape of the empty array

dtype : data-type, optional

Desired output data-type.

order : {'C', 'F'}, optional

Whether to store multi-dimensional data in row-major
(C-style) or column-major (Fortran-style) order in
memory.

Returns

out : ndarray

Array of uninitialized (arbitrary) data of the given shape, dtype,and
order. Object arrays will be initialized to None.

See Also

empty_like, zeros, ones

Notes

empty, unlike zeros, does not set the array values to zero,
and may therefore be marginally faster. On the other hand, it requires
the user to manually set all the values in the array, and should be
used with caution.

Examples

np.empty([2, 2])
array([[ -9.74499359e+001,   6.69583040e-309],
       [  2.13182611e-314,   3.06959433e-309]])         #random
np.empty([2, 2], dtype=int)
array([[-1073741821, -1067949133],
       [  496041986,    19249760]])      

numpy.empty_like

empty_like(a, dtype=None, order='K', subok=True)

Return a new array with the same shape and type as a given array.

Parameters

a : array_like

The shape and data-type of a define these same attributes of the
returned array.

dtype : data-type, optional

Overrides the data type of the result.
.. versionadded:: 1.6.0

order : {'C', 'F', 'A', or 'K'}, optional

Overrides the memory layout of the result. 'C' means C-order,
'F' means F-order, 'A' means 'F' if a is Fortran contiguous,
'C' otherwise. 'K' means match the layout of a as closely
as possible.
.. versionadded:: 1.6.0

subok : bool, optional.

If True, then the newly created array will use the sub-class
type of 'a', otherwise it will be a base-class array. Defaults
to True.

Returns

out : ndarray

Array of uninitialized (arbitrary) data with the same
shape and type as a.

See Also

ones_like : Return an array of ones with shape and type of input.

zeros_like : Return an array of zeros with shape and type of input.

empty : Return a new uninitialized array.

ones : Return a new array setting values to one.

zeros : Return a new array setting values to zero.

Notes

This function does not initialize the returned array; to do that use
zeros_like or ones_like instead. It may be marginally faster than
the functions that do set the array values.

Examples

a = ([1,2,3], [4,5,6])                         # a is array-like
np.empty_like(a)
array([[-1073741821, -1073741821,           3],    #random
       [          0,           0, -1073741821]])
a = np.array([[1., 2., 3.],[4.,5.,6.]])
np.empty_like(a)
array([[ -2.00000715e+000,   1.48219694e-323,  -2.00000572e+000],#random
       [  4.38791518e-305,  -2.00000715e+000,   4.17269252e-309]])
Last modification:January 27th, 2020 at 01:08 pm